CAARi 2018
CAARi 2018
CAARi 2018
CAARi 2018

Plenary Speakers

R. Joel England

R. Joel England
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
Dielectric Laser Acceleration Group
FACET Experimental Research Department

Dr. Joel England received his PhD at the University of California Los Angeles in 2007 for developing a technique to generate tailored electron beams for plasma wakefield acceleration.  Following a postdoctoral appointment under Prof. Bob Siemann and Dr. Eric Colby, he was the recipient of a W. K. H. Panofsky Fellowship from Stanford University, in which capacity he served as group leader for the Dielectric Laser Acceleration group at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and project manager for a Stanford-led effort to develop a laser-driven medical X-ray source under the DARPA AXiS Program.  He is now a Staff Scientist at SLAC and an executive member of the Accelerator on a Chip International Program (ACHIP), a multi-institutional effort funded by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation to develop a prototype laser-driven particle accelerator.  Dr. England is author or co-author on over 70 publications, has given numerous talks on advanced acceleration concepts, and has served as session leader or organizing committee member for various accelerator workshops and conferences.  His research interests are in novel particle beam manipulation processes and advanced acceleration techniques, including plasma and laser-driven schemes.

Plenary Talk: Applications for a Laser-Driven Accelerator on a Chip

 

David

Professor David N Jamieson
School of Physics
University of Melbourne

David is a Professor of Physics at the University of Melbourne where he was Head of the School of Physics 2008-13.  He has a PhD from Melbourne and held postdoctoral fellowships at Caltech (USA) and the University of Oxford (UK).  He was President of the Australian Institute of Physics (AIP) from 2005-6. His research expertise in the field of ion beam physics applied to test some of the key functions of a revolutionary quantum computer constructed in silicon in the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology.  In 2013 he received an outstanding service to physics award from the AIP.

Plenary Talk: Ten qubits in five years: Building a near-term quantum computer device by deterministic ion implantation based on donors in silicon